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ripopentheuniverse:

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bisexual-books:

We (Ellie and Sarah) were in Chicago today and this was the main window display at Women and Children First, the feminist book store.  

On the cardboard where it says “Rest In Power” are the names of murdered black people, from Mike Brown to Islan Nettles to ‘my friend’s student’.    To the left two signs read “Injustice is a Feminist Issue” and “Ferguson is a Feminist Issue”.   On the right a sign says “The idea that some lives matter LESS is the root of all that is wrong in the world”.  Below is a selection of books on African American issues or by African American authors, focusing on feminist, womanist, and LGBT themes.  

Across the bottom is a quote by bisexual African Caribbean-American poet and author June Jordan (that’s her yellow book to the left called Some Of Us Did Not Die, which is amazing btw).  The quote reads:

"And what shall we do, we who did not die?  What shall we do now?  How shall we grieve, and cry out loud, and face down despair?  Is there an honorable, non-violent means towards mourning and remembering who and what we loved?"

I love this store so much.

June Jordan FTW!

jenniferrpovey:

jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ

This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall

it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

Oh yes, acacia trees.

They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.

And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.

And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.

Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.

So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.

Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).

This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.

“White knighting” is a pejorative term bigots use to undermine such actions from men who are using their voices for support, not for condemnation and misogyny. Bigots use it to claim men are supporting women in the hopes of sleeping with women. Because, apparently, that’s the only reason you would ever want to treat someone as a person.
Fanboys, White Knights, and the Hairball of Online Misogyny - The Daily Beast (via wilwheaton)
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